More moms use Facebook


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Moms continue to be one of the Internet’s most desirable groups. eMarketer estimates that there were 35.3 million US mothers online in 2008, a number that is expected to reach 39.6 million by 2012. New communities and content sites for moms appear practically every day. Marketers and advertisers are constantly trying to reach this all-powerful group, who not only carry strength in their numbers but also in their purchasing power.Emineo Media Social Media Moms

More moms use Facebook, social networks than average internet users.

Have you Facebook-friended your mom yet? Even if you haven’t, you probably have more than a few connections on the social network with little ones of their own, using the site as a way to communicate, stay in touch with families and exchange information about parenting, among other things.

eMarketer estimates 23 million US moms are on Facebook this year—a figure that counts women with children under 18 in the household who use the site at least once each month. That represents well over two-thirds of all online moms in the country. Overall, eMarketer estimates that just 57.1% of internet users (including children) use Facebook monthly.

Facebook, of course, is not the only social networking site moms use. Overall, 26.5 million mothers with kids in the home use social networks at least once per month, or 79.2% of online moms. This compares to 63.7% of internet users overall.

These estimates mean that as of 2011, moms will make up 17.9% of all US social network users and 17.4% of Facebook users. But the high rates of penetration reached in this group mean growth will be relatively slow, and moms will actually lose share on the sites over time. By 2013, eMarketer estimates, 16.1% of US Facebook users will be moms with children in the home, while 17.1% of all US social network users will be mothers.

Emineo Media

Source eMarketer

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How Facebook’s New Features Will Affect Digital Marketers

Emineo Media Facebook Tools

With Facebook’s major changes set to roll out this week, little thought has been given to answering how Timeline and the revamped Open Graph will affect our interaction Emineo Media Facebook Toolswith rest of the web, and how websites stand to benefit. I believe that weaving Facebook even deeper into websites is going to yield a positive experience for consumers and sites alike. Here’s why.

Contextual Sharing

One of the notable features of the enhanced Open Graph is contextual sharing. For users, the benefit is obvious — it enables much more than just “liking” a piece of content. Now, a user can share that he or she “read” Catching Fire or that he or she “listened to” Nirvana. “Liking” an article, video or photo has thus far limited users, forcing them to show tacit approval (within the context of one-click reactions) for something that they may not necessarily find desirable.

With contextual sharing, users will no longer be boxed-in by expressing one emotional reaction. For marketers, this offers major benefits for on-site engagement and syndication.

Auto-Sharing

One of the other share features that Facebook unveiled is “frictionless sharing,” which allows sites to share any content a user reads or interacts with directly to his Facebook Ticker. It’s important to point out that the user must authorize the site to turn on this sharing functionality much in the same way that sites have already needed to allow users to explicitly authenticate. However, by enabling sharing and placing objects on a user’s Timeline, Facebook is undertaking an enormous and important process: documenting web activity.

While some end-users may cringe at the thought of their entire digital lives being “Facebooked,” this approach to broadcasting web activity appeals to its younger, most active user-base — a group that seems to care about “show and tell” even more than it does about privacy. Teens and young adults grew up with Facebook, and the transition from one- or two-click sharing to no-click sharing won’t be as uncomfortable.

The Business Upside: Data and Traffic

Getting users to interact with Facebook’s updated features for websites is an advantage in itself, but there are other, more concrete ways the revamped Facebook features will help businesses. As the user experience becomes more personal and engaging, Facebook’s functionality on websites will ultimately provide those sites with an even deeper look into whom their visitors are. This marriage of social data and on-site activity can be applied for a number of ROI-driven activities, such as hyper-specific ad targeting, content and product recommendations, and driving inventory decisions.

Just as importantly, the frictionless sharing features could be a huge boon for sites as measured by the oldest and most valuable metric on the Internet: referral traffic. By allowing auto-sharing for nearly any activity on a site, users will be able to push even more content to the News Feed, Ticker and Timeline, generating more exposure and click backs to sites.

Discovery: Now a Two-Way Street

For years, the web was about search — that is, people using search engines to find specific things online. Now, the web is shifting toward discovery — users are increasingly letting content find them via social networks. This trend actually started a few years ago with a number of sites seeing social networks drive more referral traffic than search engines. With Facebook’s new features, I think we’ll see this trend turn into a basic tenet of web optimization, as sites will soon be able to learn so much more about their users and offer targeted, shareable content that brings in more referral traffic.

Today, businesses spend millions of dollars optimizing for Google searches, trying to get found. But as social becomes a larger traffic driver, and as Facebook and other social networks continue to enable content discovery, those businesses will need to offer interactive, sharable content in order to stay relevant. Those businesses that understand how Facebook is enabling bilateral relationships between sites and users will get found, gain traffic and increase on-site engagement. Those businesses relying on search — and ignoring Facebook’s bold innovations — may soon stop getting found at all.

Source

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10 industries hurt by daily deals websites

Is there a hotter trend for small businesses and consumers than deal-of-the-day websites? Yet the boom may hurt firms in certain industries, reports IBISWorld, an Los Angeles-based market research company.

Especially vulnerable, according to IBISWorld: Small businesses that operate in highly competitive industries with low profit margins. Here are the top 10 and their profit margins:

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  • Supermarkets, grocery stores, 2%
  • Interior designers, 3%
  • Landscaping service, 3.8%
  • Hair and nail salons, 4.8%
  • Coffee and snack shops, 5.9%
  • Tour operators, 6%
  • Photography, 6.1%
  • Gym, health & fitness clubs, 8%
  • Hair loss treatment & removal, 9%
  • Alternative healthcare providers, 10%

Daily deal sites offer businesses an opportunity to increase their visibility without the upfront costs of traditional marketing campaigns. “For many companies, this can substantially increase the number of people coming in the door because subscribers are often unfamiliar with small, locally based businesses,” IBISWorld notes.

IBISWorld industry analyst Mary Gotaas says: “Although some companies within these industries experience an increase in sales by offering group discounts, many face the risk of offering more discounts than they can handle. Also, many of the daily deals directly compete with one another, so consumers are more likely to waid for the next hair salon or coffee shop offer than to become a regular patron of one particular shop.”

The popularity of daily deals sites is tempting for small firms eager to attract customers (and who isn’t?).

The 800-pound gorilla of daily deals is Groupon, whose subscriber list has exploded to 85 million from 2 million in the past 18 months, according to Local Offer Network, which distributes deals from hundreds of websites. Number 2 LivingSocial grew to 28 million subscribers from 120,000 in that time.

A study by Utpal Dholakia, an associate professor of management at Rice University, found that 55.5% of businesses that put their discounts on daily deal sites made money while almost 27%  lost money.

The study also found that only 35.9% of restaurants/bars and 41.5% of salons and spas that had run a daily deal said they would run another such promotion in the future. The most successful industries were health, services and special events, more than 70% pf which made money on their promotion, Dholakia said.

By JAN NORMAN / THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

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