Content Marketing

At One Productions we understand that content marketing involves creating unique content that fulfils your target audience’s wants and needs and brings them one step closer to you. Based on our expertise in video production, web design and advertising, One Productions is capable of crafting a marketing campaign that is optimised for your company’s specific brand strategy. As social media is now the most popular form of content marketing, the value of high-quality video production has never been higher and will yield immediate results in exposing your product to the widest possible online audience. From Facebook to Twitter, YouTube, LinkedIn, Google + and everything in between, One Productions knows how to harness the power of social media for your benefit. Of increasing importance also are podcasts, webinars, blogs and online newsletters, as nine out of ten businesses now use some form of content marketing. In the world of B2B (business to business) marketing, 86% of B2B marketers now admit to using content marketing. The results speak for themselves. Content marketers have reported huge increases in web traffic resulting from the following: 25% webinars/webcasts, 32% case studies, 36% video productions, and 45% blogs. The importance of social media is underlined by the fact that 60% of all social media posts are links to content. Explore the right content marketing options for you at One Productions, Dublin. [via]

Emineo Media Content-Marketing-Infographic

[divider_top]

What Do Small Businesses Do on Social Media?

A new survey from email marketing software firm VerticalResponse found that 43% of small businesses (100 employees or less) spend at least six hours a week on social media, with seven percent spending over 21 hours a week on Facebook, Twitter, and such. The survey also found that two-thirds of small businesses are spending more time on social media than they did a year ago, suggesting that more small businesses are either realizing or actually seeing the benefits of social media marketing.

Facebook and Twitter are still the most popular networks that small businesses are using, coming in at 90% and 70% respectively. Although LinkedIn, Google+, and Pinterest are touted as must-use networks in social media marketing, a majority of small businesses, according to the survey, don’t use these sites at all. Of all the things small businesses could do on social media, it turns out that finding and posting content takes the most time, followed by learning and education (presumably this means learning how to use the social network, the survey isn’t clear) and analyzing efforts. The least time consuming task was responding to questions.

Six hours a week is a lot, and many small businesses are struggling with the work load and the time it takes to manage multiple networks. The survey doesn’t say a whole lot on how small businesses spend these six, eight, 12 hours a week, but there are good ways to spend that time. If you’re spending this much time on social media, and want to be assured that you time is well spend, then here are the things that small businesses ought to be doing:

  1. Responding to Questions – This is a must, especially since there are much larger companies who ignore, and even delete, questions and responses from fans on Facebook and other networks. It’s a little worrisome that small businesses spend the least amount of time on this, as it means that either there aren’t questions to respond too, or questions are going unanswered for too long. If there’s any engagement from fans or potential customers on social media, then always make them a top priority.
  2. Building Relationships – Surprised this wasn’t on there, which means it either wasn’t asked, or small businesses are treating social media too much like another avenue to push a marketing message. Think of the 50/50 rule when it comes to sharing content: 50% your content, and 50% other people’s content. Yes, other people’s. Retweeting, repinning, and resharing other people’s stuff helps them as well as you. You provide more value to your own followers while making a connection with the person who’s content you are sharing. Make sure social media is used to participate in a conversation, not just to take one over or to start one. It shows that you are listening.
  3. Analyzing Efforts – This is also a must, but analyzing your social media marketing efforts is much more than counting fans and mentions and comments. Actually, those numbers don’t mean all that much. What really counts, when analyzing your social media marketing, is how much traffic social media drives to your site, how many leads are coming from social media, and how many of those leads you’re turning into customers. After all, those are the things that keep businesses going. If anything, small businesses need to be measuring their success on social media. If not, there’s no way to know if you’re wasting your time.
  4. Defining Goals – Small businesses need to spend time figuring out what they want out of social media in the first place. These goals need to line up with the core needs of the business, and need to be more specific than “increased brand awareness” or “increased customer engagement.” What’s a good goal for social media? Something specific, and targeted toward the needs of the business, like “have 10% of our leads come from social media” or “have 100 people sign up for our webinar” or “get 50 more subscribers for our blog by the end of the month.”

Emineo Media Social-Media-Infographic-resized-600

[divider_top]

Study: 43 Percent Of Total Google Search Queries Are Local

Ad network Chitika has just released some new data — you’re seeing it here first — that compares local search volumes on Google, Yahoo and Bing. The study examined both PC and mobile traffic to determine an overall number. (Chitika has now informed us that these numbers are incorrect; see postscript II below.)

Chitika looked at “millions of online ad impressions seen between September 21st and 27th, 2012.” To ensure it was measuring “local search,” Chitika compared the queries it was seeing from the engines “against its extensive database of local keywords and phrases (e.g. “near me,” “in Boston,” “around St. Louis,” etc.).”

What Chitika found was that 43 percent of the overall query volume coming from Google (mobile and PC) carried a local intent. That compared with 25 percent on Yahoo and Bing.

Roughly two years ago Google reported that 20 percent of PC queries “were related to location.” Since that time Google has put considerable effort into its local and map results, both online and in mobile.

In 2011 Google said that 40 percent of mobile search traffic is local. And last week a Google representative at an event informally said that now 50 percent of mobile search carries a local intent.

Obviously mobile search has raised the overall local percentage reported by Chitika (see postscript below). But these figures argue that local search volumes across engines are now quite massive. Indeed, they represent billions of queries monthly on the PC and mobile web. In addition they’re very high-value queries because local searchers are more likely to covert than others, especially mobile users.

Postscript: I asked Chitika to provide a breakdown of PC vs. mobile search in these findings. Chitika said that nearly three-quarters of Google’s local queries are in fact coming from mobile. It’s the opposite for Bing and Yahoo. However this is logical given that their mobile query volumes are so small compared to their PC volumes and to Google’s mobile search volume.

Postscript II: The numbers above are incorrect. Chitika contacted me today and said there was an error in their methodology. It resulted in an inflated Local and Local-Mobile total for Google. They’re providing revised/corrected figures and an explanation of what happened. I’ll do a new post exposing those shortly.

[divider_top]